Users Online : 292 About us |  Subscribe |  e-Alerts  | Feedback | Login   |   
Journal of Minimal Access Surgery Current Issue | Archives | Ahead Of Print Journal of Minimal Access Surgery
           Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size 
 ¤   Next article
 ¤   Previous article
 ¤   Table of Contents

 ¤   Similar in PUBMED
 ¤Related articles
 ¤   Citation Manager
 ¤   Access Statistics
 ¤   Reader Comments
 ¤   Email Alert *
 ¤   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed600    
    Printed48    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded45    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 248-253

Laparoscopic giant hiatal hernia repair with absorbable mesh


1 Emergency Surgery Unit, DEA Department, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy
2 Sperimental and Clinical Science Department “Mario Serio”, Florence University, Florence, Italy

Correspondence Address:
Massimiliano Ardu
Emergency Surgery Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Largo Brambilla 3 50134, Florence
Italy
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jmas.JMAS_26_21

Rights and Permissions

Background: The best operative approach to large hiatal hernias still remains controversial between suture cruroplasty and prosthetic hiatal herniorrhaphy. This study aims at analysing results from a single institution in Italy in terms of subjective and objective outcomes. Methods: Retrospectively collected data of all patients that underwent laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair since 2011 were considered. Sixty-five patients were included overall; 17 of them fit the criteria of large hiatal hernia. Follow-up (FU) was assessed by visit, questionnaires and X-ray imaging. Results: No major complications occurred in the post-operative course. No patient was lost during the FU period. Out of all the patients included, 13 agreed to have an X-ray with water-soluble contrast. The questionnaires showed a 76.5% rate of satisfaction (13 patients), and the recurrence rate demonstrated by radiology was 29.4% (five patients). There were no major mesh-related complications. Conclusion: The best operative approach for large hiatal hernias remains far from standardised: There is a lack of evidence on the use of a mesh for this kind of surgery as well as substantial controversy over the definition of what a giant hiatal hernia is. Nevertheless, the results from this study and the main studies in the literature seem to be encouraging in improving giant hiatal hernia repair outcomes.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

© 2004 Journal of Minimal Access Surgery
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Online since 15th August '04